Nanoplastica, 2008, detail of installation at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, 23 May - 5 July 2008, site-dimensions; CCAS main gallery 20390 cm wide x 8750 cm depth, with a ceiling height of 4450 cm from floor to the beginning of the roof beams.

Erica Seccombe, Nanoplastica 2008 (detail) three channel digital projection 

Nanoplastica 2008, documentation of installation at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, 23 May - 5 July 2008, site-dimensions; CCAS main gallery 20390 cm wide x 8750 cm depth, with a ceiling height of 4450 cm from floor to the beginning of the roof beams.

Nanoplastica, 2008, detail of installation at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, 23 May - 5 July 2008, site-dimensions; CCAS main gallery 20390 cm wide x 8750 cm depth, with a ceiling height of 4450 cm from floor to the beginning of the roof beams. PHOTO: Brenton McGeachie, 2008.

Nanoplastica, 2008, detail of installation at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, 23 May - 5 July 2008, site-dimensions; CCAS main gallery 20390 cm wide x 8750 cm depth, with a ceiling height of 4450 cm from floor to the beginning of the roof beams. PHOTO: Brenton McGeachie, 2008.

Nanoplastica, 2008, detail of installation at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, 23 May - 5 July 2008, site-dimensions; CCAS main gallery 20390 cm wide x 8750 cm depth, with a ceiling height of 4450 cm from floor to the beginning of the roof beams. PHOTO: Brenton McGeachie, 2008. 

NANOPLASTICA

Erica Seccombe, Nanoplastica 2008,
Edition of 5 

Three channel digital animated projection installation
No audio

Brightly translucent, Nanoplastica 
reveals to an audience the internal structures of curiously familiar creatures, compelling us to question if we really know what we are looking at. What we are observing in Nanoplastica is the actual volumetric data of a series of miniature plastic marine and invertebrate creatures from 3D Microcomputed X-ray Tomography.

Visually and conceptually intriguing as virtual objects, in real life these plastic animalia are no bigger than three-centimeters each and are moulded toys found inside a popular brand of chocolate. Volume rendered and animated in Drishti, a unique scientific volume exploration tool developed at the ANU, this data is not created through conventional meshframed CGI.

CREDITS

Created with Drishti and facilitated by Professor Tim Senden, ANU Department of Applied Mathematics, Dr Ajay Limaye, Stuart Ramsden and Drew Whitehouse. Made at Vizlab, the ANU Supercomputer Centre 2008.

CITATIONS

DIRECT VIMEO LINKS

EXHIBITED

RELATED WORKS 

FURTHER LINKS TO PROJECT RESIDENCY

FURTHER NOTES

Nanoplastica, 2008
Duration of discs: (pre HD)
Session 1: 10min 50 sec
Session 2: 9 min
Session 3: 11 min 30 sec

Price on application