Erica Seccombe, Monster (2013), installed in Science Fiction, CCAS, duration 18 min, 3D stereoscopic projection with circular polarized glasses, silver screen 3.6 X 1.8 X 16MM, 3D Microcomputed tomography rendered and animated in Drishti. PHOTO: Brenton McGeachie, 2013.

Opening night Science Fiction 16 August 2013, watching 'Monster' on the silver screen. 

Erica Seccombe. detail from the series Modern Promethius (after Shelly), 2013, dimensions vary, 3D printed, multi-object installation under UV light. From the exhibition 'Science Fiction', Canberra Contemporary Art Space, Gormon House, 17 August - 28 September 2013. 

Erica Seccombe. detail from the series Modern Promethius (after Shelly), 2013, dimensions vary, 3D printed, multi-object installation under UV light. From the exhibition 'Science Fiction', Canberra Contemporary Art Space, Gormon House, 17 August - 28 September 2013. PHOTO: Brenton McGeachie 2013 

Erica Seccombe, digital image from 'Monster' 2013, exhibited at ToSCA 2013, Natural History Museum, London 

BEAUTIFUL MONSTER

Erica Seccombe 2013

Monster (2013), 3D stereoscopic projection with circular polarized glasses, circular polarized silver screen, 3.6 X 1.8 X 16MM

Modern Promethieus (after Shelly) (2013), 3D printed objects, UV light, dimensions variable.

Taking the common garden slater Porcellio scaber as her point of departure Erica Seccombe, in collaboration with Professor Tim Senden and Dr Ajay Limaye (ANU Department of Applied Mathematics and Vizlab), applied the notion of relativity to suggest that under magnification of the most extreme kind, this benign little creature takes on alien proportions. Using the latest technologies available to science, the ANU Department of Applied Mathematics has developed 3D Microcomputed X-ray Tomography (XCT) that enables scientists to see the material structure of an object as a virtual model. Seccombe has used the resulting volumetric data and digital visualisation processes to produce an exhibition of printed three-dimensional creatures and parts thereof, that are able to inspire fear and awe in an “alien” inspired nursery.  Blurring the borders of film and scientific data the exhibition also includes a 3-D cinematic screening of the amplified isopod so that it appears significantly larger than life. DAVID BROKER, CCAS 2013

CREDITS

Monster is the result of working with Tim Senden and Ajay Limaye, two extraordinary researchers at the ANU Department of Applied Mathematics and NCI National Computational Infrastructure. Also thanks to Stuart Ramsden and Drew Whitehouse at VizLab for their ongoing support and enthusiasm! 

The collaboration is ongoing but this body of work ‘Monster’ was commissioned by David Broker at Canberra Contemporary Art Space for the exhibition Science Fiction with Benjamin Forster, and supported by the Centenary of Canberra for National Science week.

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CITATIONS

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